Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, visual artist

When Mendelssohn Bartholdy was 13 a family trip to Switzerland afforded his first opportunity to devote himself to drawing; subsequently a sketch book was always an indispensable part of his holiday luggage.

Soon the prodigy’s musical career precluded other artistic activities, but after the death of his beloved sister Fanny when he was 38 he returned to Switzerland and completed a remarkable series of watercolors. These were among his final creative activities; he died in November of that year.

This according to the preface by Margaret Crum for Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (Oxford: Bodleian Library, 1972), which reproduces items from the Bodleian Library’s collection.

Above, Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s depiction of Lucerne in July 1847; below, Piero Bellugi conducts the final movements of his sixth string symphony, written around the time he first started drawing.

Related articles:

9 Comments

Filed under Curiosities, Nature, Romantic era, Visual art

9 responses to “Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, visual artist

  1. Pingback: Sophy and Mendelssohn | Bibliolore

  2. Pingback: Moses Mendelssohn | Seit über 10.000 Jahren Erfahrung in Versklavung

  3. Pingback: Joachim Ernst Adolphe Felix Wach | Seit über 10.000 Jahren Erfahrung in Versklavung

  4. Pingback: Adolf Wach | Seit über 10.000 Jahren Erfahrung in Versklavung

  5. Pingback: John Cage, visual artist | Bibliolore

  6. Pingback: Paul Hindemith, visual artist | Bibliolore

  7. Pingback: Woody Guthrie, visual artist | Bibliolore

  8. Pingback: make music part of your life series: Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio | euzicasa

  9. Pingback: Paul Hindemith, visual artist | Bibliolore

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s